U.S. Apologized to Haiti for Inhumane Treatment of Migrants

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On Friday, a top U.S. official atoned for the treatment of Haitian immigrants at the southern border, stating it is not how the DHS officials should behave. 

U.S. officials acknowledged the injustices committed to Haitian migrants

Juan Gonzalez (senior director of the U.S. National Security Council for the Western Hemisphere) made statements during his two-day visit to Haiti. This visit was to talk with leaders about various issues, including matters relating to migration. 


Gonzalez acknowledged what happened at the border was injustice and it was wrong. He added that the people of Haiti and any other migrants should be treated with respect and dignity. 

Recently, the U.S. government came under fire for how border officials treated Haitian asylum seekers. The images circulated on social media showed men on horseback whipping Haitian migrants. 

According to the Department of Homeland Security, since September 19, the United States has already expelled over 4,600 Haitians from Texas onboard 43 flights.

Gonzalez claimed the gathering of Haitian migrants at the U.S. border calls for a public health emergency. He likewise warned other migrants contemplating the dangerous feat not to risk their lives, noting that the danger of crossing is too great. 

Gonzalez visited Haiti with U.S. assistant secretary for Western Hemisphere, Brian Nichols, amid the continuing expulsion of Haitians from the United States. They previously met with Cuban Americans and Haitian Americans on Wednesday with Haiti Prime Minister Ariel Henry.

The meeting was held to talk about the effects of the 7.2 magnitude earthquake that struck Haiti in mid-August as well as migration, the pandemic, and public safety. 

According to Nichols, during their visit, they heard a lot of people were talking about the challenges that Haitians face. He noted there was a “surprising” amount of agreement among the officials for potential solutions to these ongoing challenges. 

Nichols: solution to the challenges happening in Haiti should come from within and from its people

However, Nichols emphasized the solution to these challenges should come from within the country and its people. This was referring to recent criticism of U.S. involvement in Haitian affairs, as they try to recover from the earthquake and assassination of Haiti President Jovenel Moise.

Yet, Nichols claimed the U.S. is committed to giving Haiti and its people the support they need in order to succeed in implementing their vision. He added the conversation they had with the Haitian prime minister was constructive and encourages a holistic vision and consensus.

Nichols, however, said the future of Haiti lies in the hands of its people. He made this point while stating the U.S. is committed to giving support to Haiti to bring prosperity and security back to the country.

There is no telling how long this will take.